Vinnai-dűlő, Tarcal

Vinnai/Vénmáj/Vénmál
Recognized quality classification (Cru): Class III
Location: Tarcal, Tokaj wine region, Hungary
Named after the noble Vinnai family, this parcel first appears in written annals in 1707, having been recorded for tax purposes. Ownership transferred to the Lónyay family in the 18th century. These days, Vinnai vineyard is the source of grapes most often used in blended Majoros wines; it’s known to produce playful, vivacious fruit.

Kövesd / Nagy Kövesd-dűlő, Tarcal

Kövesd/Nagy Kövesd/Kőhegy/Kövesek/Köves/Kövesdi
Recognized quality classification (Cru): Class III
Location: Tarcal, Tokaj wine region, Hungary

This parcel is named for the many rocks and small stones that enrich its soil (“” and “köves” translate as “rock” and “studded with small stones” from the Hungarian). Written records about this plot date to 1564 when it was gifted to the local church in Tarcal by its owner, the Serédy family. The area became increasingly sought after due to the high-quality grapes it produces; in fact, starting in the mid-17th century, the plot was broken into smaller areas. Tarcal town folk took over ownership rights, and we are thrilled to produce outstanding wines from grapes grown here to this day.

We typically use Kövesd-grown grapes in our dry and blended wines sue to their pronounced, well-structured acidity.

Előhegy-dűlő, Tarcal

Known names: Előhegy-dűlő/Előhegy
Recognized quality classification (Cru): Class III
Location: Tarcal, Tokaj wine region, Hungary A very well known, highly regarded parcel located on "Kopasz-hegy" ("Bald Mountain") on the outskirts of Tarcal. First noted in the town’s annals in 1564, this vineyard has had a turbulent history passing from one influential owner to the next throughout the 16th and 17th centuries. Eventually it fell into disrepair and was resurrected as a well-respected vineyard starting in the late 1800s ad early 1900s.
As of the early aughts, the area has once again been very highly regarded for its terroir. We like to source late-harvest, overripe, slightly shriveled but not yet botrytized grapes from this plot for use in our sweet and aszú wines.

Agyag-dűlő (anno Forrás-dűlő), Tarcal

Known names: Agyag-dűlő/Forrás-dűlő/Agyak
Recognized quality classification (Cru): Class I
Location: Tarcal, Tokaj wine region, Hungary

An interesting history behind this plot – in fact, it is widely suspected it has had two identities. First written about as “Agyak” vineyard (“the one with clay in the soil”) in 1618, it has a long  record of having been owned by some of the most distinguished families of Tarcal.   By the end of the 17th century, the are was broken into further smaller plots given its proximity to a natural freshwater spring.

This vineyard’s microclimate supports the development of aszú berries but is also the source of grapes that produce terrific dry wines. Ongoing, intensive care and replanting ensure the vitality of this truly valuable plot.

Deák-dűlő, Tarcal

Known names: Deák-dűlő
Recognized quality classification (Cru): Class I
Location: Tarcal, Tokaj wine region, Hungary

The earliest references to Deák vineyard date back to 1560 when it was the property of the local Calvinist congregation. At the end of the

16th century, the plot was noted as belonging to local noblemen who divided the property into smaller pieces. By the 18th century, various

other religious congregations have claimed the area, and documents from 1772 indicate that the only female ruler of the Habsburg Empire,

Queen Maria Theresa, had decreed to officially split the vineyard into two plots: Kis- and Nagy-Deák.

This vineyard’s microclimate supports the development of aszú berries but is also the source of grapes that produce terrific dry wines. Ongoing, intensive care and replanting ensure the vitality of this truly valuable plot.

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